Avoiding the Pitfall of Pride

Description

Tulku Migmar Tsering reminds us to set our motivation before engaging in any Dharma activity such as listening to the Dharma. As Mahayana followers, we bring to mind the altruistic wish to benefit all other beings through our study, contemplation, and meditation. Tulku Migmar stresses that we do experience benefits from learning about the dharma without this motivation. We will develop wisdom based upon the practice of the Dharma while only thinking to benefit ourselves. However, the potential pitfall is that we develop pride. As our wisdom increases, the risk is that we feel proud. But if we recall that self-cherishing is the root of all our suffering, we may begin to realize that other beings also suffer in the same way. And then we can naturally wish to also help them as well. Our wisdom will then develop in an untainted, genuine way. If we always think about our own development only, we may begin to think about “my practice, my meditation”, etc. The point is to always think that we do what we do in order to benefit others as well as ourselves. With that genuine wish, even if we can’t concretely benefit others right now, we will eventually be able to help. And our minds will become quite relaxed and not tight and effortful. Thinking about others naturally reduces our self-clinging. Our minds and meditation then become more spacious and open.

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